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Homestead Rescue Hacks Revealed - Netflix

By: Editor On: Tue 25 June 2019
In: netflix
Tags: #netflix #Reality #English

Homestead Rescue Hacks Revealed (also known as "Homestead Hacks") is a spin-off series from the Discovery Channel's "Homestead Rescue" series that aired in 2016.

Homestead Rescue Hacks Revealed - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2017-05-05

Homestead Rescue Hacks Revealed - Manzanar - Netflix

Manzanar is most widely known as the site of one of ten American concentration camps where over 110,000 Japanese Americans were interned during World War II from December 1942 to 1945. Located at the foot of the Sierra Nevada in California's Owens Valley between the towns of Lone Pine to the south and Independence to the north, it is approximately 230 miles (370 km) north of Los Angeles. Manzanar (which means “apple orchard” in Spanish) was identified by the United States National Park Service as the best-preserved of the former camp sites, and is now the Manzanar National Historic Site, which preserves and interprets the legacy of Japanese American incarceration in the United States. Long before the first incarcerees arrived in March 1942, Manzanar was home to Native Americans, who lived mostly in villages near several creeks in the area. Ranchers and miners formally established the town of Manzanar in 1910, but abandoned the town by 1929 after the City of Los Angeles purchased the water rights to virtually the entire area. As different as these groups were, their histories displayed a common thread of forced relocation. Since the last incarcerees left in 1945, former incarcerees and others have worked to protect Manzanar and to establish it as a National Historic Site to ensure that the history of the site, along with the stories of those who were unjustly incarcerated there, are remembered by current and future generations. The primary focus is the Japanese American incarceration era, as specified in the legislation that created the Manzanar National Historic Site. The site also interprets the former town of Manzanar, the ranch days, the settlement by the Owens Valley Paiute, and the role that water played in shaping the history of the Owens Valley.

Homestead Rescue Hacks Revealed - Life in camp - Netflix

Food at Manzanar was based on military requirements. Meals usually consisted of hot rice and vegetables, since meat was scarce due to rationing. In early 1944, a chicken ranch began operation, and in late April of the same year, the camp opened a hog farm. Both operations provided welcome meat supplements to the incarcerees' diet. Most incarcerees were employed at Manzanar to keep the camp running. Unskilled workers earned US$8 per month ($119.8 per month as of 2018), semi-skilled workers earned $12 per month ($180 per month as of 2018), skilled workers made $16 per month ($240 per month as of 2018), and professionals earned $19 per month ($285 per month as of 2018). In addition, all incarcerees received $3.60 per month ($54 per month as of 2018) as a clothing allowance.

The incarcerees made Manzanar more livable through recreation. They participated in sports, including baseball and football, and martial arts. Lou Frizzell served as the musical director, and under his mentorship Mary Nomura became known as the “songbird of Manzanar” for her performances at dances and other camp events. The incarcerees also personalized and beautified their barren surroundings by building elaborate gardens, which often included pools, waterfalls, and rock ornaments. There was even a nine-hole golf course. Remnants of some of the gardens, pools, and rock ornaments are still present at Manzanar.

After being uprooted from their homes and communities, the incarcerees found themselves having to endure primitive, sub-standard conditions, and lack of privacy. They had to wait in one line after another for meals, at latrines, and at the laundry room. Each camp was intended to be self-sufficient, and Manzanar was no exception. Cooperatives operated various services, such as the camp newspaper, beauty and barber shops, shoe repair, and more. In addition, incarcerees raised chickens, hogs, and vegetables, and cultivated the existing orchards for fruit. Incarcerees made their own soy sauce and tofu.

Homestead Rescue Hacks Revealed - References - Netflix


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